Archive for the ‘Jerry Seinfeld’ Category

2015: Brian Williams, Letterman and The Donald

December 24, 2015
Merry Christmas, everyone -- this week's MediaPost TV blogs.

Merry Christmas, everyone — this week’s MediaPost TV blogs.

By ADAM BUCKMAN

NEW YORK, Dec. 24, 2015 — The holidays are a time for reflection.

Looking back at 2015 this week, I wrote about the year’s top TV stories and the joys of writing about Donald Trump. In between, I commented on President Obama as the nation’s Comedian in Chief and asked in another blog post: What’s the connection between the new “X Files” and Adolf Hitler’s autobiography?

Read all four of my TV blogs this week on MediaPost.com, right here:

Monday, Dec. 21: Williams Or Letterman? It’s A Toss-Up For TV Story Of The Year

Tuesday, Dec. 22: First Funnyman: Obama’s A Comedian In Chief Getting Coffee

Wednesday, Dec. 23: Mystery of ‘X Files’ Episode With Same Title as Hitler’s Autobiography

Thursday, Dec. 24: For A TV Columnist In 2015, Trump Was The Gift That Kept On Giving

Contact Adam Buckman: adambuckman14@gmail.com

Read Adam Buckman’s book: “JERK: How I Wasted My Life Watching Television” … Read a sample on his Amazon book page HERE … Then order it today!

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Read This Week’s MediaPost TV Blogs 6/15-6/19

June 19, 2015
TGIF: Thank God It's Five -- my five TV blogs for MediaPost this week, that is. Spend part of your Friday afternoon reading all five. Just follow the links, below.

TGIF: Thank God It’s Five — my five TV blogs for MediaPost this past week.  Spend part of your Friday afternoon reading all five.  Just follow the links, below.

NEW YORK, June 19, 2015 — The busiest man in TV this week may have been Matt Lauer. At the very least, he drew enough attention with two high-profile interviews to appear twice in this week’s rundown of my five MediaPost TV blogs — Tuesday’s blog about Lauer’s interview with race masquerader Rachel Dolezal and Friday’s blog on Lauer’s interview with Brian Williams. Also this week: “Seinfeld,” Donald Trump and Jeb Bush. Read all five of my MediaPost TV blogs for the week with the links below:

Monday, June 15: ‘Seinfeld’ Repeats On Hulu: Much Ado About ‘Nothing’

Tuesday, June 16: Politics Of ‘Self-Identification’ Takes Center Stage In Lauer-Dolezal Interview

Wednesday, June 17: Stars For A Day: Trump, Jeb Bush Take Over TV For Most Of Tuesday

Thursday, June 18: NBC’s Decision On Williams: Send Him Down To MSNBC

Friday, June 19: Williams’ Interview Was Painful To Watch, And Also Unnecessary

— Adam Buckman

Contact Adam Buckman: adambuckman14@gmail.com

MediaPost TV Blog Week-in-Review: June 8-12

June 12, 2015
Read all five of this week's MediaPost TV blogs -- below!

Read all five of this week’s MediaPost TV blogs — below!

NEW YORK, June 12, 2015 — This week’s MediaPost TV blogs reviewed a new comedy (“Odd Mom Out” on Bravo), interpreted Jerry Seinfeld’s comments about political correctness on campus, opined on the “decade docuseries” trend on TV, praised Turner Classic Movies for its summer film noir festival, and took a look at the post-Letterman era in late-night TV. Read ’em all, right here:

Monday, June 8: Bravo’s New Upper East Side ‘Mom’ Is Not A ‘Real’ Housewife

Tuesday, June 9: What Seinfeld Really Said About Comedic Free Speech On Campus

Wednesday, June 10: CNN Singles Out ‘The Seventies’ For Another Decade Documentary

Thursday, June 11: Film Noir Festival Proves Once Again How Much We Need TCM

Friday, June 12: Post-Dave Ratings Indicate Two Jimmies Have Not Inherited His Audience

— Adam Buckman

Contact Adam Buckman: adambuckman14@gmail.com

All 27 of My 2015 TV Upfront Stories, Curated

May 17, 2015
27 Pictures, 27 Stories: All of my Media Post stories from the 2015 TV Upfronts in New York — links below.

27 Pictures, 27 Stories: All of my Media Post stories from the 2015 TV Upfronts in New York — links below.

By ADAM BUCKMAN

NEW YORK, May 17, 2015 — It was an upfront season to remember — programming presentations all over New York City from TV networks and on-line content providers stretching from Feb. 26 (Nickelodeon) to May 14 (NBC Cable). Here, in one place: All of my 27 stories for MediaPost.com on the 2015 Upfront/Newfront season:

Feb. 26: Nick Kicks Off Upfront Season With A Big Production Promise

March 4: At Upfront, Formerly All-Male Spike Pushes Female Audience Growth

March 11: Fun And Games: At Upfront, GSN Has Good Time Stressing Originals

March 31: NBC Cable Nets Prance Into Upfront Season With New Shows

April 1: Discovery’s Upfront Strategy: Global Reach, ‘Personal’ Presentations

April 3: CMT’s Upfront Message: We’re Country To The Core

April 7: USA Network’s Upfront Theme: Heroes And Donny Deutsch, Too

April 9: New Pop Network Identifies Target Viewer As ‘Modern Grownup’

April 22: At Uptown Upfront, MTV Screams For Advertiser Attention

April 23: Arts Channel Ovation Unveils Bold Program Slate For Upfront Season

April 24: BET Wows Audience With Persuasive Upfront Show

April 27: BuzzFeed NewFront Pitches Virtues Of Short-Form Video Sharing

April 28: At NewFront, Yahoo Pins Hopes On Network TV-Style Programs

April 29: ‘Seinfeld’ Deal Dominates Hulu Upfront

May 1: Outdoor Channel Upfront Pitches Vast Reach Of Networks, Sites

May 1: A&E Upfront Goes Epic With ‘War And Peace’ Miniseries, ‘Roots’ Reboot

May 4: ‘Traditional’ Upfront Season Gives Way To Anything-Goes ‘Content’ Bazaar

May 8: Why Doing Away With Upfronts Would Be A PR Disaster

May 8: Screenvision Predicts Growth Of In-Theater Ads, Launches Ad-Targeting Tool

May 11: NBC’s 3-Pronged Plan For Fall: Stars, Live Events, Complex Dramas

May 12: Fox Fall Plan Addresses Tuesday Comedy Woes

May 12: ESPN Creates Programming, Ad Sales Synergies With ‘GMA’ on ABC

May 12: Univision Upfront: Bill Clinton Touts Hispanic Viewing Power, Net Promotes Novelas, Soccer Package

May 13: At Upfront, Turner’s Reilly Vows TNT, TBS Makeovers

May 13: CNN Adds Non-News Programming To Strong News Lineup

May 15: NBC Cable Stresses Reach, Scale Of TV Portfolio

May 15: Juvenile Seat-Saving Must Cease, And Other Upfront Observations

Contact Adam Buckman: adambuckman14@gmail.com

Comedy Darwinism: Survival of the funniest

January 19, 2010

KINGS OF COMEDY: Jerry Seinfeld and Jay Leno on the premiere episode of NBC’s ill-fated “Jay Leno Show” last September.

JAY AND JERRY ARE TWO PEAS IN AN EXCLUSIVE POD

By ADAM BUCKMAN

NEW YORK, Jan. 19, 2010 — The most revealing commentary on the whole NBC/Leno/Conan mess came from Jerry Seinfeld.

It revealed all you needed to know about show business.

Seinfeld, who is so wealthy and successful that he can be as honest as he feels like, laid it on the line: Conan O’Brien wasn’t good enough, so he got yanked.

“What did the network do to him?” Seinfeld shot back when a reporter at the Winter TV Press Tour in Pasadena earlier this month probed for Jerry’s opinion on whether NBC wasn’t being fair to O’Brien.

“I don’t think anyone’s preventing people from watching Conan,” said Seinfeld, demolishing the complaint from Conan’s camp that poor lead-ins from local news and Jay Leno’s 10 p.m. show hurt the ratings for Conan’s “Tonight Show.”

“Once they give you the cameras, it’s on you,” Seinfeld said.  “I can’t blame NBC for having to move things around. I hope Conan stays — I think he’s terrific. But there’s no rules in show business, there’s no refs.”

The lesson learned?  Show business is a dog-eat-dog world.  And at the top of one segment of show business — the comedy business — there is only room for a few.  And those few are more likely to respect those who came up the hard way than those, like Conan, who didn’t.

Seinfeld happens to be one of the ones who paid his dues; Jay Leno is another, which might help explain why these two are friends, or at least as close to being “friends” as two people can be in their business, assuming they never wind up competing for the same thing, which hasn’t happened to them yet.

Conan O’Brien, a Harvard-educated comedy writer from “The Simpsons” and “Saturday Night Live,” didn’t come up the hard way in the manner of Leno and Seinfeld.  They worked for years in malodorous comedy clubs — the places Seinfeld once characterized (in his 2002 documentary film, “Comedian”) as the “smelly gyms” of show business.

O’Brien didn’t rise through the ranks — he leapt over them when he was plucked from obscurity by Lorne Michaels to take over NBC’s “Late Night” when David Letterman left, one of the most unlikely and improbable lucky breaks ever recorded in the history of show business.

In the Darwinistic world of the comedy business, lucky breaks such as the one awarded Conan are an alien concept, which is why comedians such as Seinfeld and Leno will never admit a lucky break recipient such as Conan O’Brien into their exclusive circle.

In fact, if comedy has a hierarchy, Leno and Seinfeld are the business’ top dogs, measured especially by the yardstick that matters most, which is earning power.  They live in a rarefied world in which they two may be the only two residents.  Even Letterman, who paid his dues in the comedy clubs so many years ago, today eschews the live performances from which Seinfeld and Leno still make their bread and butter.

Seinfeld, swimming in residual money from the eternal rerun plays of his eponymous sitcom, and Leno, who makes so much money from live performances that he claims to bank his six-figure weekly paychecks from NBC and then never touches the money, are two peas in a unique pod.

Seinfeld was Leno’s first guest on “The Jay Leno Show” last September.  Seinfeld wore a tux, as if to say: Here at the pinnacle of show business, here is how we dress; it’s OK for the rest of you peons to go casual.  But not me.  (Leno wore his usual business suit and tie.)

Leno appeared in Seinfeld’s “Comedian” documentary and Seinfeld was Leno’s first phone call in 2004 when NBC proposed that he relinquish “The Tonight Show” to Conan O’Brien in 2009.  Seinfeld, playing the role of comedy godfather, apparently advised Leno to say yes.

“I called up my buddy, Jerry Seinfeld,” Leno said on “The Tonight Show” on Sept. 27, 2004, explaining why he agreed with NBC’s plan to replace him in five years with O’Brien — the news of which had broken earlier that day.

“I said, ‘Jerry what do you think?’ . . .  Jerry quit his show when it was the most popular, and I’m proud to say [“The Tonight Show’] show has been No. 1 and we’ll keep it No. 1 and then in ’09 I’ll say, ‘Conan, take it over, it’s yours,’ ’cause, you know, you can do these things until they carry you out on a stretcher or you can get out when you know you’re still doing good,” Leno said, the words seeming to pour out of him.

Carried out on a stretcher?  Dragged off by a team of wild horses was how Letterman put it back then when he commented on the transition plan two days later on his own show, “Late Show” on CBS.

“[Leno has] quit ‘The Tonight Show’,” Letterman said, setting up a joke.  “Jay Leno is leaving ‘The Tonight Show’ . . . He’s going to be gone in five years.  You know what this does?  It saves NBC the cost of a team of wild horses, that’s what that does!”

Now that Leno’s returning to “The Tonight Show,” NBC might have to reserve that team of wild horses after all.

Contact Adam Buckman: AdamBuckman14@gmail.com


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