Archive for the ‘TBS’ Category

‘Dancing’ to ‘Fargo’: This Week’s MediaPost Blogs

November 28, 2015
Presenting this week's MediaPost TV blogs: Read 'em all with the links, below.

Presenting this week’s MediaPost TV blogs: Read ’em all with the links, below.

By ADAM BUCKMAN

NEW YORK, Nov. 27, 2015 — The MediaPost TV blog ranged widely this Thanksgiving week from outer space (“The Expanse”) to the high plains (“Fargo”). Read all four of this week’s blogs, right here:

Monday, Nov. 23: Space Show’s Online, VOD Premiere Is The Stuff Of Science Fiction

Tuesday, Nov. 24: Hey, P.R. People, Could You At Least Spell The Star’s Name Right?

Wednesday, Nov. 25: ‘Dancing With The Stars’ And The Triumph Of Uplifting TV

Friday, Nov. 27: Seven Episodes Into Season Two, ‘Fargo’ Is TV Storytelling At Its Best

Contact Adam Buckman: adambuckman14@gmail.com

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Petitions Pack No Punch: This Week’s TV Blogs

November 6, 2015
This week's TV blog topics: Raven-Symone, Donald Trump, "Star Trek," "Wheel of Fortune," "Angie Tribeca." Read them all below.

This week’s TV blog topics: Raven-Symone, Donald Trump, “Star Trek,” “Wheel of Fortune,” “Angie Tribeca.” Read them all below.

NEW YORK, Nov. 6, 2015 — Protest petitions took center stage this week as Donald Trump prepared to guest-host “Saturday Night Live” this weekend. Petitioners sought to have his invitation rescinded but by midday Friday, this effort was unsuccessful.

Elsewhere in TV Land, CBS announced a new “Star Trek” series, “Wheel of Fortune” kept on spinning and TBS attempted to announce a launch plan for a new comedy series — “Angie Tribeca” — but issued a press release that was incomprehensible.

Behold: This week’s MediaPost TV blogs — follow the links, right here:

Monday, Nov. 2: Web Site Provides Protest Platform To Petty Petitioners

Tuesday, Nov. 3: Latino Protests Can’t Stop Trump On ‘SNL’

Wednesday, Nov. 4: With ‘Star Trek’ Gamble, CBS Explores Bold New Paywall Plan

Thursday, Nov. 5: TV’s Happy Place: Never-Ending ‘Wheel’ Goes ‘Round And ‘Round

Friday, Nov. 6: Advice To Publicists: Avoid Comedic Press Releases

— Adam Buckman

Contact Adam Buckman: adambuckman14@gmail.com

All 27 of My 2015 TV Upfront Stories, Curated

May 17, 2015
27 Pictures, 27 Stories: All of my Media Post stories from the 2015 TV Upfronts in New York — links below.

27 Pictures, 27 Stories: All of my Media Post stories from the 2015 TV Upfronts in New York — links below.

By ADAM BUCKMAN

NEW YORK, May 17, 2015 — It was an upfront season to remember — programming presentations all over New York City from TV networks and on-line content providers stretching from Feb. 26 (Nickelodeon) to May 14 (NBC Cable). Here, in one place: All of my 27 stories for MediaPost.com on the 2015 Upfront/Newfront season:

Feb. 26: Nick Kicks Off Upfront Season With A Big Production Promise

March 4: At Upfront, Formerly All-Male Spike Pushes Female Audience Growth

March 11: Fun And Games: At Upfront, GSN Has Good Time Stressing Originals

March 31: NBC Cable Nets Prance Into Upfront Season With New Shows

April 1: Discovery’s Upfront Strategy: Global Reach, ‘Personal’ Presentations

April 3: CMT’s Upfront Message: We’re Country To The Core

April 7: USA Network’s Upfront Theme: Heroes And Donny Deutsch, Too

April 9: New Pop Network Identifies Target Viewer As ‘Modern Grownup’

April 22: At Uptown Upfront, MTV Screams For Advertiser Attention

April 23: Arts Channel Ovation Unveils Bold Program Slate For Upfront Season

April 24: BET Wows Audience With Persuasive Upfront Show

April 27: BuzzFeed NewFront Pitches Virtues Of Short-Form Video Sharing

April 28: At NewFront, Yahoo Pins Hopes On Network TV-Style Programs

April 29: ‘Seinfeld’ Deal Dominates Hulu Upfront

May 1: Outdoor Channel Upfront Pitches Vast Reach Of Networks, Sites

May 1: A&E Upfront Goes Epic With ‘War And Peace’ Miniseries, ‘Roots’ Reboot

May 4: ‘Traditional’ Upfront Season Gives Way To Anything-Goes ‘Content’ Bazaar

May 8: Why Doing Away With Upfronts Would Be A PR Disaster

May 8: Screenvision Predicts Growth Of In-Theater Ads, Launches Ad-Targeting Tool

May 11: NBC’s 3-Pronged Plan For Fall: Stars, Live Events, Complex Dramas

May 12: Fox Fall Plan Addresses Tuesday Comedy Woes

May 12: ESPN Creates Programming, Ad Sales Synergies With ‘GMA’ on ABC

May 12: Univision Upfront: Bill Clinton Touts Hispanic Viewing Power, Net Promotes Novelas, Soccer Package

May 13: At Upfront, Turner’s Reilly Vows TNT, TBS Makeovers

May 13: CNN Adds Non-News Programming To Strong News Lineup

May 15: NBC Cable Stresses Reach, Scale Of TV Portfolio

May 15: Juvenile Seat-Saving Must Cease, And Other Upfront Observations

Contact Adam Buckman: adambuckman14@gmail.com

Who will replace Letterman? Enter Conan

April 5, 2013
Conan O'Brien on his TBS show "Conan" (Photo: TBS)

Conan O’Brien on his TBS show “Conan” (Photo: TBS)

By ADAM BUCKMAN

NEW YORK, April 5, 2013 — It’s a funny thing about predictions: They have a way of being wrong — especially mine.

Nevertheless, here’s a prediction that’s part educated guess and part wishful thinking: The man who will (or should) be hired eventually to succeed David Letterman is Conan O’Brien.

Why? Because when all the candidates and their qualifications are sifted and weighed, Conan should emerge as the one with the best resumé — not to mention the best temperament and fan base for the job.

Here’s the case for Conan:

1) Conan is the one guy who can give the two Jimmies a run for their money: Conan O’Brien would give CBS the best chance of maintaining a level playing field with Jimmy Fallon (who’s now 38) and Jimmy Kimmel (now 45) or even beating them.  Though he’s a few years older than each of them, Conan — who will turn 50 this month — is cut from the same generational cloth as those two.  And because he is a few years older, his fans have been with him longer.  They’re also intensely loyal and will doubtlessly follow him wherever he goes.

Also read: An aging generation mourns loss of Jay, Dave

2) Conan is well-connected, well-liked, and experienced on both coasts: He’s the only late-night host of his generation who’s done shows in both New York and California and he is apparently comfortable in both.  Moreover, he’s been around long enough to have formed relationships with dozens (if not hundreds) of A-list celebrities.  And, like Fallon, he comes out of the Lorne Michaels/”Saturday Night Live”/”Late Night” world and has many of the same friendships that those guys have.  If Conan were to come to New York and take up residence at the Ed Sullivan Theater, the late-night booking wars in New York would be intense.

Or, if it somehow came to pass that CBS would move “Late Show” to California — to take up the vacuum that will be left there after “The Tonight Show” shifts to New York — Conan would likely do very well when competing with Kimmel for West Coast guests.

3) Of all the late-night hosts out there, Conan O’Brien is the one who is most like Letterman.  Like Dave, Conan is the one guy who is the “least similar” (or “most different”) from the other late-night hosts.  For example, as  one columnist pointed out the other day, when you stop and really look at Jimmy Fallon, his style bears similarities to Jay Leno’s — greeting every guest as if he or she is just the greatest actor/actress/comedian/recording star/whatever who has ever lived, and then engaging in a conversation with him or her in which everything he or she says is just the cleverest thing Fallon has ever heard in his life.   (Actually, come to think of it, he’s more prone to this behavior than Leno.)

But Conan?  Like Letterman, he goes his own way with guests.  Sure, he’s well-mannered with them, but on his show, they’re not always regarded as sacred cows.  A case in point was the bit seen the other night on “Conan,” when Triumph the Insult-Comic Dog encountered the “Real Housewives of Atlanta” and verbally assaulted them without mercy.

Late-night wars: Our coverage so far:

NBC’s bold move: Fix a show that wasn’t broken

Fallon in 2011: I’ll take over when Jay’s ready

Leno jokes: ‘Young’ Jay will replace ‘old’ Dave

Move ‘The Tonight Show’ to NYC? Fuhgettaboutit

Complete timeline of Jay Leno’s war with NBC

Of course, this whole scenario would depend heavily on how Conan himself perceives his future, where he wants to take his career, whether he’d even consider a move back to New York to host “Late Show” or whether CBS would even be interested in him (my guess is: They will be).  At present, Conan seems satisfied at TBS, and the people at Turner seem happy enough with him that they just extended his contract to November 2015.

In addition, no reports have emerged during all the recent attention being paid to the succession plan now in place at “The Tonight Show” that CBS is now thinking about doing the same thing with Letterman and his “Late Show.”

The last time anyone addressed the prospect of Letterman calling it a day was Letterman himself, when he was interviewed by Oprah Winfrey for one of her “Next Chapter” shows that aired on OWN last January.  Dave talked about it when Oprah asked him about his relationship with CBS President Les Moonves.

Yes,” Dave said then, “I really abused him [years ago on “Late Show”] because I thought that’s what guys in that position were for. I realized I was making mistakes and they’ve been nothing but gracious and generous to me. So now, he and I have an agreement: When he wants me to go, all he has to do is call and say, ‘You know, Dave, it’s time to go,’ and I’ll go. I will miss doing what I’m doing, but I won’t feel like I have left anything on the table.”

Well, whether the end of the Letterman era (whenever it eventually happens) will play out quite that smoothly, with Letterman acquiescing that readily, remains to be seen.

Still, the odds favor it happening in the next few years, and Conan O’Brien is the best fit to replace him.  The fact is (and not that anyone should care how I feel personally about the situation), I have always liked Conan.  And if he was to get another shot at competing in the 11:35 p.m. time period, then, to me, all would be right in the universe.

And if and when it happens, please remember that you read it here first (unless someone else has already written it and you’ve read it elsewhere — which is entirely possible!).

Contact Adam Buckman: adambuckman14@gmail.com

End of an era as late-night TV grows on cable

April 12, 2010

By ADAM BUCKMAN

NEW YORK, April 12, 2010 — It’s the end of the world as we know it.

TBS’ decision, announced today, to mount two back-to-back late-night shows on weekday evenings means we’ve reached another one of those watershed moments in the evolution of cable TV’s long effort to even the playing field with the old broadcast networks.

Have you heard? Conan’s going to cable.

Once upon a time it would have been unthinkable:  Two hours of original late-night talk and comedy on a basic cable channel — a two-hour block of programming that for years was something only a broadcast network could afford to do.

Not anymore.

By signing former NBC star Conan O’Brien and pairing him with George Lopez, TBS is signaling that the era of late-night dominance by the likes of NBC and CBS is over.  TBS is saying: We can do it too — we have the distribution, the money (via advertising and subscriber revenue), the audience numbers, the channel positions and the know-how to do what the old guard can do.

Imagine it: Here’s this cable network that traffics almost exclusively in reruns of old sitcoms, running hour upon hour of them — “The Office,” “Family Guy” and “Tyler Perry’s House of Payne,” some “Seinfeld” and heaven knows what else.

And yet, despite this cable channel’s paucity of original anything, its analysis of the TV landscape has revealed that the time is right to take on the biggest, most established TV networks in late-night TV, and not with half-hour satires such as “The Daily Show” and “Colbert Report,” or with a single hour either.  No — TBS plans on taking on CBS and NBC with two hours of traditional television: Personality-hosted late-night shows with monologues and celebrity guests — the kinds of shows seen since the dawn of time only on the so-called “big” networks (and only on CBS since 1993).

Over the years, the cable networks grew and the broadcast networks shrank.  Now, in the wake of Conan O’Brien — a network TV stalwart — deciding to stake his future on cable, you might say they’re all pretty much the same.

Contact Adam Buckman: AdamBuckman14@gmail.com


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