Archive for the ‘The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon’ Category

Fall Season Gets Under Way: This Week’s Blogs

September 25, 2015
This week's TV blogs: "Minority Report," "Blindspot," "The Muppets," Brian Williams, "Heroes Reborn" and, on Friday, a late-night candidates' report card. Links below.

This week’s TV blogs: “Minority Report,” “Blindspot,” “The Muppets,” Brian Williams, “Heroes Reborn” and, on Friday, a late-night candidates’ report card. Links below.

NEW YORK, Sept. 25, 2015 — With the fall TV season having its official start this week, the emphasis was on reviews of new shows in three out of five of this week’s MediaPost TV blogs — Monday, Tuesday and Thursday.

Also this week: The return of Brian Williams and, to close out the week, a report card grading the presidential candidates’ appearances on the late-night shows this month.

Read all five of my MediaPost TV blogs from the past week with these handy, convenient links:

Monday, Sept. 21: Fall Season Begins With Three New Shows Monday Night

Tuesday, Sept. 22: New Fall Season, Night 2: ABC’s ‘Muppets’ Is Eerily Similar To ’30 Rock’

Wednesday, Sept. 23: Snarky Tweets Greet Brian Williams As He Returns For Pope’s Visit

Thursday: Sept. 24: ‘Heroes Reborn’: NBC Revives Show It Cancelled Five Years Ago

Friday, Sept. 25: September To Remember: Grading The Candidates On The Late-Night Shows

— Adam Buckman

Contact Adam Buckman: adambuckman14@gmail.com

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TCM ‘Brand’ Slam: This Week’s MediaPost Blogs

September 4, 2015
This week's MediaPost TV blog: TCM launches brand-awareness campaign, Kanye and Kim at the MTV Video Music Awards, the late-night wars heat up, here come the campaign commercials and Joan Rivers, a year after her death. Links below.

This week’s topics: TCM launches brand-awareness campaign, Kanye and Kim at the MTV Video Music Awards, the late-night wars heat up, here come the campaign commercials, and Joan Rivers, a year after her death. Links below.

NEW YORK, Sept. 4, 2015 — Variety was the order of the day (if not the week) in this week’s TV blogs.

The week started with a mostly thumbs-down interpretation of a new brand-awareness campaign created by Turner Classic Movies that turned the word “movie,” a noun, into a verb. The week ended with a commentary about Joan Rivers’ show “Fashion Police” on the one-year anniversary of her death.

In between, Tuesday’s blog looked at the social-media numbers from Sunday’s Video Music Awards on MTV, Wednesday’s blog previewed next week’s renewal of the late-night wars, and Thursday’s blog welcomed the pending arrival of mud-slinging political commercials.

Read all five of this week’s MediaPost blogs, by Adam Buckman, with these links, below:

Monday, Aug. 31: TCM Creates Tagline That Turns ‘Movie’ Into A Verb

Tuesday, Sept. 1: Kanye For President? Crunching The VMA Social Media Numbers

Wednesday, Sept. 2: New Late-Night War Heats Up With Trump, Biden Bookings

Thursday, Sept. 3: Bring On The Political Commercials – And The Dirtier The Better

Friday, Sept. 4: ‘Fashion’ Forward: Year After Joan Rivers’ Death, Her Show Goes On

— Adam Buckman

Contact Adam Buckman: adambuckman14@gmail.com

MediaPost TV Blog Week-in-Review: June 8-12

June 12, 2015
Read all five of this week's MediaPost TV blogs -- below!

Read all five of this week’s MediaPost TV blogs — below!

NEW YORK, June 12, 2015 — This week’s MediaPost TV blogs reviewed a new comedy (“Odd Mom Out” on Bravo), interpreted Jerry Seinfeld’s comments about political correctness on campus, opined on the “decade docuseries” trend on TV, praised Turner Classic Movies for its summer film noir festival, and took a look at the post-Letterman era in late-night TV. Read ’em all, right here:

Monday, June 8: Bravo’s New Upper East Side ‘Mom’ Is Not A ‘Real’ Housewife

Tuesday, June 9: What Seinfeld Really Said About Comedic Free Speech On Campus

Wednesday, June 10: CNN Singles Out ‘The Seventies’ For Another Decade Documentary

Thursday, June 11: Film Noir Festival Proves Once Again How Much We Need TCM

Friday, June 12: Post-Dave Ratings Indicate Two Jimmies Have Not Inherited His Audience

— Adam Buckman

Contact Adam Buckman: adambuckman14@gmail.com

Multi-talented Colbert is right man for the job

April 10, 2014
Stephen Colbert will replace David Letterman as host of CBS's "Late Show" next year.

Stephen Colbert will replace David Letterman as host of CBS’s “Late Show” next year.

By ADAM BUCKMAN

NEW YORK, April 10, 2014 — It takes more than just stand-up comedy talent to qualify as a late-night host these days.

That’s the lesson of the announcement today that Stephen Colbert has been anointed David Letterman’s successor as host of “Late Show” on CBS.  With Letterman announcing just last week his intention to retire next year, CBS moved quickly to sign Colbert to a five-year contract — representing an extraordinary amount of faith in Colbert’s potential for not only maintaining CBS’s position in the late-night competition at 11:35, but also improving it.

For that role, Colbert, 49, emerges as the best man for the job.  Why?  Because he is multi-talented, which is suddenly a requirement for hosting a late-night show — a trend driven mainly by Jimmy Fallon.

Colbert might not possess Fallon’s talent for mimicry and celebrity impressions, but Colbert is an accomplished professional in all the other aspects of show business — particularly singing, dancing and acting.  He’s a shrewd showman who writes best-selling books, created a highly profitable show (“The Colbert Report”) built around a fictional character he developed and plays personally, and seems to create excitement and draw crowds wherever he goes.

With his abundance of theatrical talent (he’s formally trained in all the basics, from Northwestern), Colbert is more than a match for the multifaceted Fallon where it now counts the most — in the production of comedy-performance bits so arresting that they stand up to multiple viewings on video and social-media Web sites in the hours and days after they air for the first time on TV.

This is where Colbert’s “Late Show” and Fallon’s “Tonight Show” will battle it out most.  As for the time period’s other competitor, “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” CBS’s hiring of Colbert gives Kimmel an opportunity to stand out from the others.  As Kimmel has long emphasized, he is more a “broadcaster” than a “comedian” — a recognition that he possesses none of  the basic performing skills of his competitors.  Still, his bits are wildly creative and they play well (and often better than Fallon’s) in the all-important video after-markets.

Two more things on this hiring of Colbert:

1) Some are concerned that Colbert won’t be able to make the transition from the “Stephen Colbert” character he plays on Comedy Central to the real Colbert.  That happens to be a non-issue.  He’ll do fine as the “real” guy behind the “Late Show” desk.

2) What about Conan? Thank you to all of the hundreds of you who visited TVHowl over the past week to read my post from a year ago suggesting that Conan O’Brien would be a great choice to replace Letterman when the time comes for Letterman to call it a day.  Alas — it is not to be.  The Conan story is an interesting one: There was a time when he really was the late-night heir-apparent — if not “The Tonight Show” (we all know what happened there) then the “Letterman” show.  Unfortunately, if this was still an ambition of Conan’s, to break into the network fray at 11:35 p.m., then this once-every-20-years generational shift in late-night TV seems to have passed him by.

Contact Adam Buckman: adambuckman14@gmail.com

The rights and the wrongs of Fallon’s debut

February 18, 2014
Jimmy Fallon in his debut as host of "The Tonight Show" Monday night. (Photo: NBC)

Jimmy Fallon in his debut as host of “The Tonight Show” Monday night. (Photo: NBC)

By ADAM BUCKMAN

NEW YORK, Feb. 18, 2014 — Jimmy Fallon and his handlers got a great deal of it right in producing his debut show as host of “The Tonight Show” Monday night.

The set was beautiful — a classy interior that reflected the iconic architecture of midtown Manhattan where the newly relocated “Tonight Show” is now situated.

The show made the most of its new New York  home when it featured a sunset performance by U2 on the roof of 30 Rockefeller Plaza.  It was as if to say to doubters who pooh-poohed the show’s move from California (doubters such as yours truly): Here’s why we moved from boring suburban Burbank to the very center of New York City,  OK?

And, as if to dispel the notion that New York would not be as fertile a location as southern California for accessing A-list guests (again, yours truly is guilty as charged with promoting this perception), a parade of A-listers came on one at a time to participate in an elaborate comedy bit “welcoming” Jimmy to “The Tonight Show” — from Robert De Niro to Lady Gaga.

They’re both closely associated with New York City, but at least one of the other stars was not — Kim Kardashian — who’s a southern California celebrity if there ever was one.  She’s also the only one of the celebs seen Monday night on “Tonight” who was also seen on Jay Leno’s final show earlier this month, providing (perhaps inadvertently) the only discernible link between the two shows.

In fact, Fallon’s “Tonight Show” was so shiny and new and full of upbeat energy that it was easy to forget that Leno was last seen a mere 12 days earlier.   While watching the debut of the Fallon “Tonight Show” Monday night, it seemed as if Leno had been gone a lot longer, and his “Tonight Show” a relic of the distant past, rather than a show that ran for the better part of 22 years and ended only on Feb. 6.

Previously: Children’s hour: Fallon takes over ‘Tonight’: Jimmy’s ‘Romper Room’ mentality will render ‘The Tonight Show’ completely unrecognizable

One nice touch: Positioning the U2 rooftop performance in the middle of the show, something late-night shows never do traditionally.   Placing the musical guests at the end of the show — as all of the shows do — is so customary that slotting the U2 number earlier in the show was a downright revolutionary thing to do.  I found myself thinking: Hey, are they allowed to do that?  It turns out that they are.

The only weakness of the show was, again, Fallon’s comportment with his guests.  With both Will Smith and U2, Fallon played the role of the wide-eyed, grinning, giggling fan who just can’t believe that these stars are sitting there in the same room with him.

It’s an attitude he ought to lose: The top-tier hosts in late-night have never affected that pose.  David Letterman, Jay Leno, even Jimmy Kimmel — they always come across as if they regard these celebrities as their equals, not as sacred idols whose presence on their shows constitutes some sort of miracle.

That was the style established by Johnny Carson, whose mantle Jimmy Fallon now wears, for better or worse.  Get used to it.

Contact Adam Buckman: adambuckman14@gmail.com


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